How to fine-tune your article pitches

Written on:April 24, 2014
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Freelance journalists find they have to be more focused than ever when pitching their articles for publication.

It’s important that you research your target readership and study the contributors’ guidelines.

For instance, students on our travel journalism course find that Conde Nast’s requirements are very different from Wanderlust‘s

The National Readership Survey site is useful. This link enables you to select a publication, or a sector, and find some useful information.

And, if you need to know other details, like the percentage of readers, their gender, their social category etc, you should visit their magazine’s website.

For instance, this page contains useful details about Cosmopolitan.

This video gives some useful tips.

Students on our broadcast journalism course use RAB

Getting this type of information does involve some thorough searching. But, if it helps you get work published, then it’s worth doing.

See our NCTJ journalism courses

Helping small PR firms target their press releases

Written on:April 23, 2014
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Written on:April 21, 2014
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Written on:April 18, 2014
We haven’t seen the back of CLED just yet

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Written on:April 15, 2014
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Do scruffy reporters need a dressing down?

Written on:April 14, 2014
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Written on:April 11, 2014
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Headings should get straight to the point

Written on:April 9, 2014
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The internet has produced a revolution in headline writing. Headings with cringey puns and plays on words are ‘yesterday’ in many sectors. Key search phrases and locations are more important … a point we emphasise on our blogging course Of course, journalists and students on our PR course don’t like it. They like witty headings, or ones that promote the client. It’s best to use obvious headings on fliers and…

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